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  • 25 Factors to Consider When Adopting from Taiwan

    taiwanese adoption

    Click on each factor to learn more. Current as of November, 2014. This information is subject to change; therefore, check with an agency that places from this country for the most current information.

    + Parental Age
    Parents must be between 25 and 55 years old and at least 20 years older than the child.  The upper age limit can be flexible for couples adopting an older child.

    + Length of Marriage
    2 years, although some agencies require longer

    + Divorce
    2 divorces per couple

    + Children in Family
    Up to 1 child for parents adopting a younger child.  Up to 3 children for parents adopting an older child.

    + Single Applicant
    Not allowed 

    + Sexual Orientation
    Does not knowingly place with homosexuals

    + Children Available
    Healthy children 2 to 13 years old, children with mild to moderate special needs and sibling groups.  Infants are occasionally available.

    + Gender
    Boys and girls; parents may request a gender.

    + Referral Method
    The Taiwanese adoption service provided matches a family with an available child.  Birth families are often involved in the selection process and the biological parents give final consent after the referral is accepted. 

    + Travel in Country
    One trip, approximately 1 week long.  Both parents must travel.  Some families are required to make 2 trips; the first to attend a court hearing and the second to escort their child home. 

    + Wait For Referral (After Dossier Submitted)
    12-24 months for healthy toddlers and infants.  The wait is shorter for older children and special needs children.

    + Approximate Cost
    $22,000 – $27,000 + travel

    + Orphanage/Foster Care
    Privately run orphanages or foster families

    + How Children Enter Government Care
    Relinquished due to social stigma and lack of support for single mothers; removal due to neglect or abuse.

    + Prevalence of FASD
    Birth mothers are asked about alcohol consumption during pregnancy at relinquishment; most report none or minimal use.

    + Adequacy of Medical Reports
    Good; if child is relinquished, the birth mother is asked an extensive list of questions on medical history and prenatal care and habits.  Parents can expect to receive photos and in-depth medical and developmental information.  Children receive excellent medical care after birth.

    + Post Adoption Reports
    Required at 3, 6 and 12 months, then annually for 4 years.  Reports must include a photo be prepared by a social worker or adoption agency.

    + Additional Information

    • Applicants must be in good physical and mental health. Applicants who have experienced depression or have a BMI over 30 may have difficulties.
    • Adoptions are finalized before parents travel to the country to pick up the child.
    • Perspective parents can expect to receive photos, in-depth medical and developmental information, birth family history and regular updates. Some agencies and orphanages allow parents to speak to their children via Skype after the referral is accepted and the parents are waiting to travel.
    • Although it happens infrequently, a birth mother has the right to change her mind up to the court hearing. After the court hearing where she relinquishes her parental rights, she has 10 days to change her mind. Adoptive parents do not travel until after this time period. If a birth mother changes her mind, adoptive parents usually are given another referral in a timely manner.
    • It may be possible to meet birth mother and for child to search for and meet his birthparents.
    • As of July 2014, the Universal Accreditation Act requires all American adoption agencies, whether they work with Hague countries or not, need to be accredited under the same standards that apply to Hague Convention adoption cases.  This has the potential to effect adoptions from Taiwan, including kinship and independent adoptions.  Listen to this Creating a Family show for more information on how the Universal Accreditation Act will effect international adoptions.

    © Creating a Family

    Available from www.CreatingaFamily.org, the national adoption and infertility education and support organization. Please do not reprint without giving credit to Creating a Family and a link to the website.

    Image credit: Luke,Ma

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