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  • Books to Help Prepare Kids for the Adoption of a Sibling

    Adoption of a Sibling-compressed

     

      Things Little Kids Need to Know

      Things Little Kids Need to Know by Susan Uhlig (ages 2-6)

       

       

       

       

       

      I'm A Big Sister

      I’m a Big Sister or I’m a Big Brother (ages 2-6) – by Joanna Cole and Maxie Chambliss. These are not adoption specific, but since they don’t cover the pregnancy and hospital part of becoming an older sibling, they can be used by adoptive families. There is also a section for parents.

       

       

       

      Seeds of Love: For Brothers and Sisters of International Adoption

      Seeds of Love: For Brothers and Sisters of International Adoption by Mary Petertyl (ages 2-8)

       

       

       

       

      Bringing Asha Home

      Bringing Asha Home by Uma Krishnaswami (ages 2-8) – Eight-year-old Arun can’t wait to meet his baby sister, but it takes a year for the adoption from India to be finalized. Good book for talking about the adoption of a new sibling and explaining how the process works. Features a bi-racial (Indian/white) family.

       

       

       

      My Mei Meiby

      My Mei Meiby Ed Young (ages 2-8) – Fantastic art work. Both girls are adopted from China

       

       

       

       

      The New Baby

      The New Baby by Mercer Mayer (ages 3+) – This is a good book to prepare your toddler or young preschooler for the adoption of a newborn. It is not adoption specific.

       

       

       

       

      Murphy's Three HomesMurphy’s Three Homes: A Story for Children in Foster Care by Jan Levinson Gilman and Kathy O’Malley (ages 3-8) – This books tells the story of a puppy named Murphy who is moved from place to place until he ends up at a home where he is loved and cared for. It is written for foster children, but it could also be used to introduce siblings to the concept of foster care adoption.

       

       

      A New Barker in the House

      A New Barker in The House by Tomie dePaola (ages 4-7) – This is one of the continuing books in the Barker Twin series. In this book the parents are adopting a Spanish-speaking toddler. At first the new child is overwhelmed by his rambunctious siblings, but soon they all settle in to become a family.

       

       

       

      Just Add One Chinese Sister

      Just Add One Chinese Sister: An Adoption Story by Patricia McMahon and Conor Clarke McCarthy (ages 4-8)

       

       

       

       

      A Sister for Matthew: A Story About Adoption

      A Sister for Matthew: A Story About Adoption by Pamela Kennedy (ages 4-8) – This is a nice book to help prepare your younger kids for the adoption of a sibling. It addresses the natural concerns they may feel, and is a good conversation starter. Although it is listed for up to age 8, I think most 8 year olds would find it a bit babyish unless they are listening in when you read it to a younger child.

       

       

      Jin Woo

      Jin Woo by Eve Bunting (ages 4-10)

       

       

       

       

       

      Rebecca's Journey HomeRebecca’s Journey Home by Brynn Sugarman (ages 4-10) – The story of a Jewish family who adopts a little girl from Vietnam. It’s a good look at how to honor an adopted child’s birth culture while also including her in her new culture. “Now the baby had three names. She had a Vietnamese Name: Le Thi Hong. She had an English name: Rebecca Rose. And she had a Hebrew name: Rivka Shoshanah.”

       

       

       

      Waiting for MayWaiting for May by Janet Morgan Stoeke (ages 5+) – Written from the perspective of a brother awaiting the adoption of his new little sister from China, this book is can be used to introduce siblings to the idea of adoption. This story follows a family’s long adoption journey to China and focuses on the older brother to be’s feelings and emotion both during the wait and when they finally meet May. Briefly, the mother explains how a birth mother might feel. The brother is disappointed when May cries continually and clings to her caretaker. Finally, May becomes intrigued by her big brother’s buttons and allows him to hug her. Great book.

       

       

      Is That Your Sister

      Is That Your Sister by Catherine and Sherry Bunin (ages 5-10)

       

       

       

       

       

      Emma's Yucky Brother

      Emma’s Yucky Brother by Jean Little (ages 5-10) – Great for families adopting a toddler or older child to help prepare the older siblings. The family is adopting from the foster care system in the US, but this book could be adapted for a family adopting an older child internationally.

       

       

       

       

      WISE Up Powerbook

      W.I.S.E. Up! Powerbook by the Center for Adoption Support and Education (ages 8+)- A fantastic resource to use with tweens and teens to help them handle the inevitable questions they may get about your upcoming adoption. It’s a good resource for the whole family to use together.

       

       

       

       

      Siblings in Adoption

      Siblings in Adoption and Foster Care: Traumatic Separations and Honored Connections by Deborah N. Silverstein and Susan Livingston Smith- This book is a comprehensive resource on issues facing siblings during foster care or adoption. It is written for adults, but it is good to consult as you prepare your children for the adoption of a sibling, especially if you are adopting an older child

       

       

       


      Things Little Kids Need to Know

      Things Little Kids Need to Know by Susan Uhlig (ages 2-6)

       

       

       

       

       

      I'm A Big Sister

      I’m a Big Sister or I’m a Big Brother (ages 2-6) – by Joanna Cole and Maxie Chambliss. These are not adoption specific, but since they don’t cover the pregnancy and hospital part of becoming an older sibling, they can be used by adoptive families. There is also a section for parents.

       

       

       

      Seeds of Love: For Brothers and Sisters of International Adoption

      Seeds of Love: For Brothers and Sisters of International Adoption by Mary Petertyl (ages 2-8)

       

       

       

       

       

      Bringing Asha Home

      Bringing Asha Home by Uma Krishnaswami (ages 2-8) – Eight-year-old Arun can’t wait to meet his baby sister, but it takes a year for the adoption from India to be finalized. Good book for talking about the adoption of a new sibling and explaining how the process works. Features a bi-racial (Indian/white) family.

       

       

       

      My Mei Meiby

      My Mei Meiby Ed Young (ages 2-8) – Fantastic art work. Both girls are adopted from China

       

       

       

       

      The New Baby

      The New Baby by Mercer Mayer (ages 3+) – This is a good book to prepare your toddler or young preschooler for the adoption of a newborn. It is not adoption specific.

       

       

       

       

      Murphy's Three HomesMurphy’s Three Homes: A Story for Children in Foster Care by Jan Levinson Gilman and Kathy O’Malley (ages 3-8) – This books tells the story of a puppy named Murphy who is moved from place to place until he ends up at a home where he is loved and cared for. It is written for foster children, but it could also be used to introduce siblings to the concept of foster care adoption.

       

       


      A New Barker in the House

      A New Barker in The House by Tomie dePaola (ages 4-7) – This is one of the continuing books in the Barker Twin series. In this book the parents are adopting a Spanish-speaking toddler. At first the new child is overwhelmed by his rambunctious siblings, but soon they all settle in to become a family.

       

       

       

      Just Add One Chinese Sister

      Just Add One Chinese Sister: An Adoption Story by Patricia McMahon and Conor Clarke McCarthy (ages 4-8)

       

       

       

       

      A Sister for Matthew: A Story About Adoption

      A Sister for Matthew: A Story About Adoption by Pamela Kennedy (ages 4-8) – This is a nice book to help prepare your younger kids for the adoption of a sibling. It addresses the natural concerns they may feel, and is a good conversation starter. Although it is listed for up to age 8, I think most 8 year olds would find it a bit babyish unless they are listening in when you read it to a younger child.

       

       

      Jin Woo

      Jin Woo by Eve Bunting (ages 4-10)

       

       

       

       

       

      Rebecca's Journey HomeRebecca’s Journey Home by Brynn Sugarman (ages 4-10) – The story of a Jewish family who adopts a little girl from Vietnam. It’s a good look at how to honor an adopted child’s birth culture while also including her in her new culture. “Now the baby had three names. She had a Vietnamese Name: Le Thi Hong. She had an English name: Rebecca Rose. And she had a Hebrew name: Rivka Shoshanah.”

       

       

       

      Waiting for MayWaiting for May by Janet Morgan Stoeke (ages 5+) – Written from the perspective of a brother awaiting the adoption of his new little sister from China, this book is can be used to introduce sibllings to the idea of adoption. This story follows a family’s long adoption journey to China and focuses on the older brother to be’s feelings and emotion both during the wait and when they finally meet May. Briefly, the mother explains how a birth mother might feel. The brother is disappointed when May cries continually and clings to her caretaker. Finally May becomes intrigued by her big brother’s buttons and allows him to hug her. Great book.

       

       

      Is That Your Sister

      Is That Your Sister by Catherine and Sherry Bunin (ages 5-10)

       

       

       

       

       

      Emma's Yucky Brother

      Emma’s Yucky Brother by Jean Little (ages 5-10) – Great for families adopting a toddler or older child to help prepare the older siblings. The family is adopting from the foster care system in the US, but this book could be adapted for a family adopting an older child internationally.

       

       

       

       

      WISE Up Powerbook

      W.I.S.E. Up! Powerbook by the Center for Adoption Support and Education (ages 8+)- A fantastic resource to use with tweens and teens to help them handle the inevitable questions they may get about your upcoming adoption. It’s a good resource for the whole family to use together.

       

       

       

       


      WISE Up Powerbook

      W.I.S.E. Up! Powerbook by the Center for Adoption Support and Education (ages 8+)- A fantastic resource to use with tweens and teens to help them handle the inevitable questions they may get about your upcoming adoption. It’s a good resource for the whole family to use together.

       

       

       

       

      Siblings in Adoption

      Siblings in Adoption and Foster Care: Traumatic Separations and Honored Connections by Deborah N. Silverstein and Susan Livingston Smith- This book is a comprehensive resource on issues facing siblings during foster care or adoption. It is written for adults, but it is good to consult as you prepare your children for the adoption of a sibling, especially if you are adopting an older child

       

       

      Image credit: Shinagawa


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