Books for Children Conceived through Egg Donation

Best books for children conceived through egg donation

A tiny itsy bitsy gift of life, an egg donor story

A Tiny Itsy Bitsy Gift of Life: An Egg Donor Story by Carmen Martinez Jover (ages 2-6) – A great picture book to start a discussion about egg donation with young children. Two rabbits long for a child, but the mommy rabbit doesn’t have any eggs. Then one day a kind lady rabbit gives them “a tiny itsy bitsy gift of life” that allows them to have their baby. The book is very colorful and ideal for children even before they can read, because the pictures are so full of details it easily captures the child s attention.

Happy Together

Happy Together: An Egg Donation Story by Julie Marie (ages 2-6) – Happy Together is a heartwarming book to help introduce the concept of egg donation to a young child. Told through clear language and cheerful illustrations, readers will join Mommy and Daddy bear on the journey to fulfill their greatest wish of becoming parents. With help from a doctor, an egg from a special lady called a donor and Daddy’s seed, a baby grew in Mommy’s tummy and was welcomed with great joy. Happy Together will comfort children with the assurance of being very much wanted and loved.

 

You Were Made for MeYou Were Made For Me by Sheri Sturniolo – This sweet story with great illustrations follow a couple as they experience the hopes, dreams and disappointments of creating a family. The book explains how the generosity and love of others can grow into the most wonderful gift. You Were Made For Me takes a look into the unique and wonderful ways some families are made, and the journey of love that brings them together.

 

 

 

Mommy Was Your Tummy BigMommy, Was Your Tummy Big? by Carolina Nadel (under age 5) – With charming illustrations and simple words, a mother elephant explains her use of donor eggs to her child. This book helps introduce young children to the concepts of in vitro fertilization and donor eggs  in simple terms without going into the details of reproduction.

 

 

 

Tabitha and Timothy Grow a FlowerTabitha and Timothy Grow a Flower by Sarah Shackleton and Gillian Coulson (under age 5) – Tabitha and Timothy want to grow a flower, but it doesn’t happen as easily as they expect. After many unsuccessful attempts with their own seeds, they find out about a kind lady who can help them. With her assistance, they achieve their dreams and grow a beautiful flower. This is a starter book on the subject of third party reproduction, written for a young child and to introduce the idea of egg donation. Since many people choose to keep their circumstances private and not share with anyone that their child was conceived via third party reproduction, this book does not mention egg donation either within its pages or on its cover.

 

Hope & Will Have a BabyHope and Will Have a Baby by Irene Celcer – Written for ages 5-8, this series of books tells birth stories about surrogacy, egg donation, embryo donation, sperm donation, and adoption. The beginning and end of each book is the same, but the middle section is specific to each topic. Contains some religious overtones.

 

 

 

“Before You Were Born”Before You Were Born series of books, by Janice Grimes RN, on egg donation: Before You Were Born… Our Wish for a Baby: The Story Of A Donor EggSingle Mom – Donor Sperm/Donor Egg

 

 

 

The Seed the Egg and the Magic Love TummyThe Egg, The Seed, and The Magic Love Tummy  by Grandpa (under age 5).  Great illustrated storybook for explaining the process of conception through Egg Donation in simple childlike terms.

 

 

 

Hattie PeckHattie Peck by Emma Levey (under age 4) – Hattie Peck is a heart-warming tale of triumph in the face of adversity and is a perfect bedtime story.  Hattie is a chicken who has only ever laid one egg and it didn’t hatch.  She goes on an adventure to find eggs that will hatch to create her family.  With sweet illustrations, this book gently introduces the idea of hatching someone else’s eggs to be a mother.

 

 

 

WishWish by Matthew Cordell (Ages 3-5 years old) – When an elephant couple decides it is time to have a child, unexpected challenges arise but, at last, the pair’s deepest wish comes true. With softly hued watercolor, pen, and ink illustration, this book allows for a gentle, open introduction into the topic surrounding the special circumstances of how a family might be created.

 

 

 

The Pea that was MeThe Peas That Was Me: An IVF Story by Kimberly Kluger-Bell (Ages 3-5 years old) – Reading this charming storybook to your preschooler is a wonderful way to introduce them to the fact that you wanted them very much but had trouble having them. The very basic fact that it takes an egg and a sperm to make a baby is introduced.

 

 

 

Families Come in Many FormsFamilies Come In Many Forms by Bella Mei Wong – Along the way Alex meets his friends’ families – traditional, adopted, divorced, blended, IVF, same sex and others. These family forms are not presented as “different”, but are treated as a normal part of today’s world.  This book can be used to start conversations about families and “to help normalize ‘alternative’ family forms.”

 

 

 

The Dancing Fish and The Clever CrabThe Dancing Fish and the Clever Crab by Ms. Reen (Ages 2-10 years old) – This book was written as an aid to parents who conceived a child via the use of donor egg or sperm. The decision whether to disclose the child’s genetic origin’s to him or her is an important one for parents. With bright illustrations, it allows parents to approach the topic in simple children’s terms.

 

 

 

Somys SearchSomy’s Search, a Single Mum by a Choice Story by Carmen Martínez Jover – This is a story to help single mothers by choice to share with their child how they were conceived. Its is a story of a squirrel, Somy, and how she become a Mum.

 

 

 

Your StoryYour Story: How Special Babies are Made by Gina Hashrard (Ages 2-4 year old) – This is a book for young children who have been conceived by egg donation. Professional guidance dictates that the parents of egg-donor children may like to raise their child with the knowledge that they are from an egg-donor pregnancy.

 

 

 

The extra buttonThe Extra Button by Jules Blundell – Benny and Rose wanted more than anything to have their own family. A cute, illustrated story where a gingerbread couple’s desire to have a baby to help explain the difficult concept of donor conception to young children at an age appropriate level.

 

 

 

It Takes Love to Make a BabyIt Takes Love (and some other stuff) to Make a Baby by L. L. Bird – The book introduces children to several concepts and vocabulary words such as “ovaries,” “uterus,” “pregnant,” “sperm,” “egg,” “testicles,” “sperm donor,” and “sperm bank” and explains what each term means when it comes up in the context of the description of how babies are made in two-mom families.

 

 

 

The Chicken Who Couldn't Lay EggsThe Chicken Who Couldn’t Lay Eggs! by Taylor Brandon – This true story based illustrated book explains the path of infertility to motherhood. A fun way to engage adults and children into the discussion of the origin of their lives.

 

 

 

The Twin Kangaroo TreThe Twin Kangaroo Treasure Huntasure Hunt: A Gay Parenting Story by Carmen Martinez Jover (ages 3-5 years old) – This book is an introduction for the children created via donor egg and surrogacy and introduces the terms “egg donor” and “surrogate.”

 

 

 

You Were Meant to BeYou were Meant To Be! by Sherry Kean & Rosemarie Gellen (ages 3-5 years old) – This book takes a family-building and a child-conception approach and uses the “spare parts” and “the helper” scripts. It also introduces the concept of anonymous donation.

 

 

 

One Little EggOne Little Egg by Kimberly DeMeo – This story is filled with action, emotion and of course, education about egg donation. The author was compelled to write this children’s book for two very important reasons, and their names are Miranda and Sydney! After five long years of unsuccessful procedures, she and her husband decided to have a baby through egg donation.

 

 

 


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