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  • Books To Help Explain Adoption To Birth Siblings of Adopted Children

    Explaining Adoption To Birth Siblings Of Adopted Children

     

      The Tummy Mummy

      The Tummy Mummy by Michelle Madrid-Branch. (ages 3-6) A wise owl guides the Tummy Mummy in a book that shows the love of both birth moms and adoptive parents for their shared child. It is written to explain adoption to an adopted child, but its focus on the birth mother makes it appropriate.

       

       

       

      Sam's Sister

       

      Sam’s Sister by Juliet Bond (ages 3-7 year old). The only book I’ve found written specifically for birth siblings of adopted children. The story is told by 5-year-old Rosa, whose newborn brother is placed in an open adoption. Compassionate.

       

       

       

       

      The Rainbow EggThe Rainbow Egg by Linda Hendricks (ages 4-8). An unconventional chicken finds herself with egg, but no nest and unable to raise the chic. She is guided to a chicken house where she decides it is best to place her egg with a chicken family with a nest. There are parts of this story that are confusing, but it does focus on the birthmother and could be a good conversation starter.

       

       

       

       

      In My Heart

       

      In My Heart (ages 3-8) by Molly Bang. This picture book celebrates the bond between all types of parents and children.

       

       

       

       

       

      We Belong Together: a Book about Adoption and Families

       

      We Belong Together: a Book about Adoption and Families by Todd Parr (ages 3-6). We Belong Together explores the ways that people can choose to come together to make a family.

       

       

       

       

       

      How I Was Adopted

       

       

      How I Was Adopted by Joanna Cole (ages 4-8). Explains adoption in general.

       

       

       

       

      Mr. Rogers - Let's Talk About It: Adoption

       

      Mr. Rogers-Let’s Talk About It: Adoption by Fred Rogers (ages 4-8). I love Mr. Rogers. He doesn’t focus on first families at all, but I just love his general philosophy and calming demeanor. He is a brother through adoption.

       
      Motherbridge of Love

      Motherbridge of Love by Xinran (4-10 year old). A picture book about the love between a child, a mother, and a birthmother. I think the age range is a bit ambitious since most 10 year olds could be bored, but it is a good conversation starter even at that age. It is written to explain adoption to an adopted child, but its focus on the birth mom makes it appropriate.

       

       

       

       

      The Mulberry BirdThe Mulberry Bird by Anne Braff Brodzinsky (ages 6-12) Mother bird is doing her best to raise her baby alone until a storm destroys her nest and she must decide whether it is best for her child to continue to struggle on her own or should she place him with another family that has a strong safe nest. This is best as a read aloud book for the 6-8 age range, but I would suggest reading it out loud to even the older kids to allow time for discussion.

       

       

       

      WISE Up Powerbook

       

      W.I.S.E. Up Powerbook by Marilyn Schoettle (6-teens). Great resource for older adopted kids, and I would assume that much of the information would also be appropriate for older kids whose mother placed a child for adoption.

       

      The Tummy Mummy

      The Tummy Mummy by Michelle Madrid-Branch. (ages 3-6) A wise owl guides the Tummy Mummy in a book that shows the love of both birth moms and adoptive parents for their shared child. It is written to explain adoption to an adopted child, but its focus on the birth mother makes it appropriate.

       

       

       

      Sam's Sister

       

      Sam’s Sister by Juliet Bond (ages 3-7 year old). The only book I’ve found written specifically for birth siblings of adopted children. The story is told by 5-year-old Rosa, whose newborn brother is placed in an open adoption. Compassionate.

       

       

       

       

      The Rainbow EggThe Rainbow Egg by Linda Hendricks (ages 4-8). An unconventional chicken finds herself with egg, but no nest and unable to raise the chic. She is guided to a chicken house where she decides it is best to place her egg with a chicken family with a nest. There are parts of this story that are confusing, but it does focus on the birthmother and could be a good conversation starter.

       

       

       

       

      In My Heart

       

      In My Heart (ages 3-8) by Molly Bang. This picture book celebrates the bond between all types of parents and children.

       

       

       

       

       

      We Belong Together: a Book about Adoption and Families

       

      We Belong Together: a Book about Adoption and Families by Todd Parr (ages 3-6). We Belong Together explores the ways that people can choose to come together to make a family.

       

       

       

       

       

      How I Was Adopted

       

       

      How I Was Adopted by Joanna Cole (ages 4-8). Explains adoption in general.

       

       

       

       

      Mr. Rogers - Let's Talk About It: Adoption

       

      Mr. Rogers-Let’s Talk About It: Adoption by Fred Rogers (ages 4-8). I love Mr. Rogers. He doesn’t focus on first families at all, but I just love his general philosophy and calming demeanor. He is a brother through adoption.
      Motherbridge of LoveMotherbridge of Love by Xinran (4-10 year old). A picture book about the love between a child, a mother, and a birthmother. I think the age range is a bit ambitious since most 10 year olds could be bored, but it is a good conversation starter even at that age. It is written to explain adoption to an adopted child, but its focus on the birth mom makes it appropriate.

       

      The Tummy Mummy

      The Tummy Mummy by Michelle Madrid-Branch. (ages 3-6) A wise owl guides the Tummy Mummy in a book that shows the love of both birth moms and adoptive parents for their shared child. It is written to explain adoption to an adopted child, but its focus on the birth mother makes it appropriate.

       

       

       

      Sam's Sister

       

      Sam’s Sister by Juliet Bond (ages 3-7 year old). The only book I’ve found written specifically for birth siblings of adopted children. The story is told by 5-year-old Rosa, whose newborn brother is placed in an open adoption. Compassionate.

       

       

       

       

      The Rainbow EggThe Rainbow Egg by Linda Hendricks (ages 4-8). An unconventional chicken finds herself with egg, but no nest and unable to raise the chic. She is guided to a chicken house where she decides it is best to place her egg with a chicken family with a nest. There are parts of this story that are confusing, but it does focus on the birthmother and could be a good conversation starter.

       

       

       

       

      In My Heart

       

      In My Heart (ages 3-8) by Molly Bang. This picture book celebrates the bond between all types of parents and children.

       

       

       

       

       

      We Belong Together: a Book about Adoption and Families

       

      We Belong Together: a Book about Adoption and Families by Todd Parr (ages 3-6). We Belong Together explores the ways that people can choose to come together to make a family.

       

       

       

       

       

      How I Was Adopted

       

       

      How I Was Adopted by Joanna Cole (ages 4-8). Explains adoption in general.

       

       

       

       

      Mr. Rogers - Let's Talk About It: Adoption

       

      Mr. Rogers-Let’s Talk About It: Adoption by Fred Rogers (ages 4-8). I love Mr. Rogers. He doesn’t focus on first families at all, but I just love his general philosophy and calming demeanor. He is a brother through adoption.
      Motherbridge of LoveMotherbridge of Love by Xinran (4-10 year old). A picture book about the love between a child, a mother, and a birthmother. I think the age range is a bit ambitious since most 10 year olds could be bored, but it is a good conversation starter even at that age. It is written to explain adoption to an adopted child, but its focus on the birth mom makes it appropriate.

       

       

       

       

      The Mulberry BirdThe Mulberry Bird by Anne Braff Brodzinsky (ages 6-12) Mother bird is doing her best to raise her baby alone until a storm destroys her nest and she must decide whether it is best for her child to continue to struggle on her own or should she place him with another family that has a strong safe nest. This is best as a read aloud book for the 6-8 age range, but I would suggest reading it out loud to even the older kids to allow time for discussion.

       

       

       

      WISE Up Powerbook

       

      W.I.S.E. Up Powerbook by Marilyn Schoettle (6-teens). Great resource for older adopted kids, and I would assume that much of the information would also be appropriate for older kids whose mother placed a child for adoption.

       

      Motherbridge of LoveMotherbridge of Love by Xinran (4-10 year old). A picture book about the love between a child, a mother, and a birthmother. I think the age range is a bit ambitious since most 10 year olds could be bored, but it is a good conversation starter even at that age. It is written to explain adoption to an adopted child, but its focus on the birth mom makes it appropriate.

       

       

       

       

      The Mulberry BirdThe Mulberry Bird by Anne Braff Brodzinsky (ages 6-12) Mother bird is doing her best to raise her baby alone until a storm destroys her nest and she must decide whether it is best for her child to continue to struggle on her own or should she place him with another family that has a strong safe nest. This is best as a read aloud book for the 6-8 age range, but I would suggest reading it out loud to even the older kids to allow time for discussion.

       

       

       

      WISE Up Powerbook

       

      W.I.S.E. Up Powerbook by Marilyn Schoettle (6-teens). Great resource for older adopted kids, and I would assume that much of the information would also be appropriate for older kids whose mother placed a child for adoption.

       
       
       
      Image credit: John-Morgan

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